EMDR Intensives

EMDR addresses the psychological and physical symptoms stemming from adverse life experiences. EMDR is not just for trauma; it is also used for performance enhancement.

Resources to learn about EMDR:
• What is EMDR? Learn the basics
• What is an actual EMDR session like? Learn the 8 phases of treatment
• Introductory video about EMDR
• EMDR experts explain the benefits of EMDR
• EMDR patients share their stories
• An EMDR therapist shares her EMDR experience

Research in support of EMDR effectiveness:
• Twenty-four randomized controlled trials support the positive effects of EMDR therapy in the treatment of emotional trauma and other adverse life experiences relevant to clinical practice.
• Seven of 10 studies reported EMDR therapy to be more rapid and/or more effective than trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy.
• Twelve randomized studies of the eye movement component noted rapid decreases in negative emotions and/or vividness of disturbing images, with an additional 8 reporting a variety of other memory effects.
• Numerous other evaluations document that EMDR therapy provides relief from a variety of somatic complaints.
Research and frequently asked questions about EMDR

RESEARCH ON INTENSIVE EMDR THERAPY IS POSITIVE
• Intensive application of trauma-focused therapy seems to be well tolerated in patients with PTSD, enabling faster symptom reduction with similar, or even better, results, while reducing the risk that patients drop out prematurely. Learn more here and here.
• Intensive EMDR treatment is feasible and is indicative of reliable improvement in PTSD symptoms in a very short time frame. Learn more here.
• An intensive program using EMDR therapy is a potentially safe and effective treatment alternative for complex PTSD. Learn more here.
• The economy is compelling: even compared to other trauma therapy, the intensive format may decrease treatment time, because of time not spent on a) checking in at the beginning of each session, b) addressing current crises and concerns, c) focusing on stabilizing and coping skills that the client won’t need after trauma healing, or d) assisting the client in regaining composure at the end of the session. Learn more here.